What NFL owners are saying about their new national anthem policy

NFL team owners on Wednesday voted to approve a new national anthem policy, but as of Wednesday evening only a handful of those owners had commented on a decision that was sending transcendent ripples of controversy throughout the league.

The league’s policy statement cited “respect for the flag and the Anthem” multiple times as the key to the modification. Previously, NFL rules required all players to be on the field for the national anthem, but standing during the anthem was suggested, not required. The new policy allows players to remain off the field for the national anthem, but those who choose to be on the field are required to stand.

“I have always believed it is the responsibility of sports teams to be very proactive in our communities. In this great country of ours, there are so many people who are hurting and marginalized, which is why I am proud of our players for continuously working to influence positive change.”

The New York Times reported that financial group owner Ben Navarro offered $2.6 billion. The Times also reported Fanatics founder Michael Rubin dropped out of the bidding after he was told he would need to pay more than $2.5 billion.

Beyond the cash, part of the appeal of Tepper as a buyer was the fact that he owns a 5 percent stake in the Pittsburgh Steelers, meaning the NFL’s vetting of a new owner would be less involved. Tepper will need to sell that stake in the Steelers before his purchase of the Panthers can become official in July. Tepper is the lone investor in the sale, but if he wants, he will be able to bring in minority partners. They would need to be league-approved, too.

David Alan Tepper, 60, is the founder and president of global hedge fund Appaloosa Management, L.P., and a well-known philanthropist. He founded Appaloosa in 1993.

Tepper’s net worth, according to Forbes, is $11 billion. He has been a billionaire since 2003.

Tepper grew up in Stanton Heights, Pittsburgh, in a middle-class, Jewish family; his father, Harry, was Cheap Personalized Jerseys an accountant, and his mother, Roberta, was an elementary school teacher. He has Cheap Retro NBA Jerseys three children: Brian, Randi and Casey. He and his wife, Marlene, divorced in 2014.

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